Dictionary: GANG'DAYS – GAOL

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GANG'DAYS, n.

Days of perambulation.

GANG'HON, n.

A flower. Ainsworth.

GANG'LI-AC, a.

Relating to a ganglion. [GAN'GLI-AC, accent in 1841 Addenda.]

GANG'LI-ON, n. [Gr. γαγγλιον.]

  1. In anatomy, a small circumscribed tumor, found in certain parts of the nervous system. Wistar. Cyc.
  2. In surgery, a movable tumor formed on the tendons, generally about the wrist. Parr.

GANG'LI-ON-A-RY, a.

Composed of ganglions. [GAN'GLI-ON-A-RY, accent in 1841 Addenda.]

GANG-LI-ON'IC, a.

Pertaining to a ganglion; as, the ganglionic nerves of the digestive organs; or the ganglionic nerves of common sensation. Prout.

GAN-GLI-ON'IC, a.

Relating to a ganglion. [1841 Addenda only.]

GAN'GRE-NATE, v.t.

To produce a gangrene. Brown.

GAN'GRE-NA-TED, pp.

Mortified.

GAN'GRE-NA-TING, ppr.

Mortifying.

GAN'GRENE, n. [Fr. from L. gangræna; Gr. γαγγραινα; Syr. gangar.]

A mortification of living flesh, or of some part of a living animal body.

GAN'GRENE, v.i.

To become mortified.

GAN'GRENE, v.t.

To mortify.

GAN'GREN-ED, pp.

Mortified.

GAN-GRE-NES'CENT, a.

Tending to mortification.

GAN'GREN-ING, ppr.

Mortifying.

GAN'GRE-NOUS, a.

Mortified; indicating mortification of living flesh.

GANG'WAY, n.

A passage, way or avenue into or out of any inclosed place, especially a passage into or out of a ship, or from one part of a ship to another; also a narrow platform of planks laid horizontally along the upper part of a ship's side, from the quarter deck to the forecastle. To bring to the gangway, in the discipline of ships, is to punish a seaman by seizing him up and flogging him.

GANG'WEEK, n.

Rogation week, when processions are made to lustrate or survey the bounds of parishes. Dict.

GAN'IL, n.

A kind of brittle limestone. Kirwan.

GAN'NET, n. [Sax. ganot. See Gander.]

The Solan Goose, a fowl of the genus Pelicanus, about seven pounds in weight, with a straight bill, six inches long, and palmated feet. These fowls frequent the isles of Scotland in summer, and feed chiefly on herrings. Encyc.

GANT'LET, or GAUNT'LET, n. [Fr. gantelet, from gant, a glove; It. guanto; D. want; Dan. and Sw. vante, a glove.]

A large iron glove with fingers covered with small plates, formerly worn by cavaliers, armed at all points. To throw the gantlet, is to challenge; and To take up the gantlet, is to accept the challenge.

GANT'LOPE, n. [The last syllable is from the Teutonic, D. loopen, to run. The first is probably from gang, a passage. The German has gassenlaufer, street runner.]

A military punishment inflicted on criminals for some hainous offense. It is executed in this manner; soldiers are arranged in two rows, face to face, each armed with a switch or instrument of punishment; between these rows, the offender, stripped to his waist, is compelled to pass a certain number of times, and each man gives him a stroke. A similar punishment is used on board of ships. Hence this word is chiefly used in the phrase, to run the gantlet or gantlope. Dryden. Mar. Dict.

GAN'ZA, n. [Sp. ganso, a goose. See Gander.]

A kind of wild goose, by a flock of which a virtuoso was fabled to be carried to the lunar world. Johnson. Hudibras.

GAOL, n. [Fr. geôle; Arm. geol or jol; W. geol; Norm. geaule; geole; Sp. jaula, a cage, a cell; Port. gaiola. Qu. Class Gl, No. 11, 36, Ar. As the pronunciation gole accords with that of goal, a different word, it would be convenient to write this word uniformly jail.]

A prison; a place for the confinement of debtors and criminals.