Dictionary: GUM'-BOIL – GUN'SHOT

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GUM'-BOIL, n.

A boil on the gum.

GUM-ELASTIC, or ELASTIC-GUM, n. [caoutchouc,]

A singular substance, obtained from a tree in America by incision. It is a white juice, which, when dry, becomes very tough and elastic, and is used for bottles, surgical instruments, for overshoes, &c. This substance will probably be used for various other purposes, being perfectly impermeable to water. Nicholson. Encyc.

GUM'LAC, n.

The resinous produce of an insect which deposits its eggs on the branches of a tree called bihar, in Assam, a country bordering on Tibet, and elsewhere in Asia. [See Lac.] Nicholson.

GUM'MI-NESS, n.

  1. The state or quality of being gummy; viscousness.
  2. Accumulation of gum. Wiseman.

GUM-MOS'I-TY, n.

The nature of gum; gumminess; a viscous or adhesive quality. Floyer.

GUM'MOUS, a.

Of the nature or quality of gum; viscous; adhesive. Woodward.

GUM'MY, a.

  1. Consisting of gum; of the nature of gum; viscous; adhesive. Ralegh.
  2. Productive of gum. Milton.
  3. Covered with gum or viscous matter. Dryden.

GUMP, n. [Dan. and Sw. gump, the rump of a fowl.]

A foolish person; a dolt. [ Vulgar.]

GUMP'TION, n. [Sax. gymene, care; gyman, to observe or be careful.]

Care; skill; understanding. [Vulgar.]

GUM-RES'IN, n. [See Resin.]

Certain inspissated saps. A mixed juice of plants, consisting of resin and various other substances, which have been taken for a gummy substance. The gum-resins do not flow naturally from plants, but are mostly extracted by incision, in the form of white, yellow or red emulsive fluids, which dry and consolidate. The most important species are olibanum, galbanum, scammony, gamboge, euphorbium, asafetida, aloes, myrrh, and ammoniac. Fourcroy.

GUM-SEN'E-GAL, n.

A gum resembling gum-arabic, brought from the country of the river Senegal in Africa.

GUM-TRAG'A-CANTH, n.

The gum of a thorny shrub of that name, in Crete, Asia, and Greece. Encyc.

GUM'-TREE, n.

A hollow tree. [Local.]

GUN, n. [W. gwn; Corn. gun.]

An instrument consisting of a barrel or tube of iron or other metal fixed in a stock, from which balls, shot or other deadly weapons are discharged by the explosion of gunpowder. The larger species of gnus are called cannon; and the smaller species are called muskets, carbines, fowling-pieces, &c. But one species of fire-arms, the pistol, is never called a gun.

GUN, v.i.

To shoot. [Obs.]

GUN'-BAR-REL, n.

The barrel or tube of a gun.

GUN'-BOAT, n.

A boat or small vessel fitted to carry a gun or two at the bow. Mar. Dict.

GUN'-CAR-RIAGE, n.

A wheel carriage for bearing and moving cannon.

GUN'NEL, n. [See GUNWALE.]

GUN'NER, n.

One skilled in the use of guns; a cannonier; an officer appointed to manage artillery. The gunner of ship of war has the charge of the ammunition and artillery, and his duty is to keep the latter in good order, and to teach the men the exercise of the guns. Mar. Dict.

GUN'NER-Y, n.

The act of charging, directing and firing guns, as cannon, mortars and the like. Gunnery is founded on the science of projectiles.

GUN'NING, n.

The act of hunting or shooting game with a gun. In the earlier times, the art of gunning was but little practiced. Goldsmith

GUN'POW-DER, n.

A composition of saltpeter, sulphur and charcoal, mixed and reduced to a fine powder, then granulated and dried. It is used in artillery, in shooting game, in blasting rocks, &c.

GUN'ROOM, n.

In ships, an apartment on the after end of the lower gun-deck, occupied by the gunner, or by the lieutenants as a mess-room. Mar. Dict.

GUN'SHOT, a.

Made by the shot of a gun; as, a gunshot wound.