Dictionary: IN-TER-CES'SOR – IN-TER-COM'MON-AGE

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IN-TER-CES'SOR, n. [L. See Intercede.]

  1. A mediator; one who interposes between parties at variance, with a view to reconcile them; one who pleads in behalf of another. Milton.
  2. A bishop who, during a vacancy of the see, administers the bishopric till a successor is elected. Encyc.

IN-TER-CES'SO-RY, a.

Containing intercession; interceding.

IN-TER-CHAIN', v.t. [inter and chain.]

To chain; to link together. Shak.

IN-TER-CHAIN'ED, pp.

Chained together.

IN-TER-CHAIN'ING, ppr.

Chaining or fastening together.

IN'TER-CHANGE, n.

  1. Mutual change, each giving and receiving; exchange; permutation of commodities; barter; as, the interchange of commodities between New York and Liverpool.
  2. Alternate succession; as, the interchange of light and darkness. Sweet interchange / Of hill and valley, rivers, woods and plains. Milton.
  3. A mutual giving and receiving; reciprocation; as, an interchange of civilities or kind offices.

IN-TER-CHANGE', v.t. [inter and change.]

  1. To put each in the place of the other; to give and take mutually; to exchange; to reciprocate; as, to interchange places; to interchange cares or duties. I shall interchange / My waned state for Henry's regal crown. Shak.
  2. To succeed alternately. Sidney.

IN-TER-CHANGE'A-BLE, a.

  1. That may be interchanged; that may be given and taken mutually. Bacon.
  2. Following each other in alternate succession; as, the four interchangeable seasons. Holder.

IN-TER-CHANGE'A-BLE-NESS, n.

The state of being interchangeable.

IN-TER-CHANGE'A-BLY, adv.

Alternately; by reciprocation; in a manner by which each gives and receives. Hooker.

IN-TER-CHANG'ED, pp.

Mutually exchanged; reciprocated.

IN-TER-CHANGE'MENT, n.

Exchange; mutual transfer. [Little used.] Shak.

IN-TER-CHANG'ING, ppr.

Mutually giving and receiving; taking each other's place successively; reciprocating.

IN-TER-CHAP'TER, n.

An interpolated chapter.

IN-TER-CI'DENT, a. [L. intercido.]

Falling or coming between. Boyle.

IN-TER-CIP'I-ENT, a. [L. intercipiens. See Intercept.]

Intercepting; seizing by the way; stopping.

IN-TER-CIP'I-ENT, n.

He or that which intercepts or stops on the passage. Wiseman.

IN-TER-CIS'ION, n. [s as z. L. intercido; inter and c├Ždo, to cut.]

Interruption. [Little used.] Brown.

IN-TER-CLUDE', v.t. [L. intercludo; inter and cludo, to shut.]

  1. To shut from a place or course by something intervening; to intercept. Holder.
  2. To cut off; to interrupt. Mitford.

IN-TER-CLUD'ED, pp.

Intercepted; interrupted.

IN-TER-CLUD'ING, ppr.

Interrupting.

IN-TER-CLU'SION, n. [s as z.]

Interception; a stopping.

IN-TER-CO-LUM-NI-ATION, n. [L. inter and columna, a column.]

In architecture, the space between two columns. By the rules of the art, this should be in proportion to the hight and bulk of the columns. Encyc.

IN-TER-COM'MON, v.i. [inter and common.]

  1. To feed at the same table. Bacon.
  2. To graze cattle in a common pasture; to use a common with others, or to possess or enjoy the right of feeding in common. Common because of vicinage, is where the inhabitants of two townships contiguous to each other, have usually intercommoned with one another. Blackstone.

IN-TER-COM'MON-AGE, n.

Mutual commonage. Roberts.