Dictionary: FORE-JUDG'ED – FORE-NAM'ED

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FORE-JUDG'ED, pp.

Prejudged.

FORE-JUDG'ING, ppr.

Prejudging.

FORE-JUDG'MENT, n.

Judgment previously formed. Spenser.

FORE-KNOW', v.t. [See Know.]

To have previous knowledge of; to foresee. Who would the miseries of man foreknow? Dryden. For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to conformed to the image of his son. Rom. viii.

FORE-KNOW'A-BLE, a.

That may be foreknown. More.

FORE-KNOW'ER, n.

One that foreknows.

FORE-KNOW'ING, ppr.

Knowing beforehand.

FORE-KNOW'LEDGE, n. [forenol'ledge.]

Knowledge of thing before it happens; prescience. If I foreknew, / Foreknowledge had no influence on their fault. Milton.

FORE-KNOWN', pp.

Known beforehand.

FOR'EL, n.

A kind of parchment for the cover of books.

FORE'-LAND, n.

A promontory or cape; a point of land extending into the sea some distance from the line of the shore; a head land; as, the North and South Foreland in Kent, in England.

FORE'LAND, n.

In fortification, a piece of ground between the wall of a place and the moat.

FORE-LAY', v.t.

  1. To lay wait for; to entrap by ambush. Dryden.
  2. To contrive antecedently. Johnson.

FORE-LEAD'ER, n.

One who leads others by his example.

FORE-LEND', v.t.

To lend or give beforehand. Spenser.

FORE'-LOCK, n.

  1. The lock or hair that grows from the forepart of the head. Take time by the forelock. Swift.
  2. In sea language, a little flat pointed wedge of iron, used at the end of a bolt, to retain it firmly in its place. Mar. Dict.

FORE-LOOK', v.t.

To look beforehand or forward. Spenser.

FORE'-MAN, n.

  1. The first or chief man; particularly, the chief man of a jury, who acts as their speaker.
  2. The chief man in a printing office or other establishment, who conducts the whole work.

FORE'-MAST, n.

The mast of a ship or other vessel which is placed in the forepart or forecastle, and carries the foresail and foretop-sail yards. Encyc. Foremast-men, on board of ships, the men who take in the top-sails, sling the yards, furl the sails, &c. Encyc.

FORE-MEANT', a. [forement'.]

Intended beforehand. Spenser.

FORE-MEN'TION-ED, a.

Mentioned before; recited or written in a former part of the same writing or discourse.

FORE'-MOST, a.

  1. First in place; most advanced; as, the foremost troops of an army.
  2. First in dignity. In honor he held the foremost rank.

FORE-MOTH'ER, n.

A female ancestor. Prideaux.

FORE'-NAME, n.

The first name that precedes another, as Imperator C├Žsar Augustus. Selden.

FORE-NAM'ED, a.

  1. Named or nominated before.
  2. Mentioned before in the same writing or discourse.