Dictionary: OUT-KNAVE – OUT-LIV'ED

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OUT-KNAVE, v.t. [outna've.]

To surpass in knavery. L'Estrange.

OUT'LAND, a. [Sax. utl├Žnde, a foreigner.]

Foreign. [Obs.] Strutt.

OUT'LAND-ER, n.

A foreigner; not a native. [Obs.] Wood.

OUT-LAND'ISH, a. [Sax. utl├Žndisc; out and land.]

  1. Foreign; not native. Donne. Nevertheless, even him did outlandish women cause to sin. Neh. xiii.
  2. Born or produced in the interior country, or among rude people; hence, vulgar; rustic; rude; clownish. [This is the sense in which the word is among us most generally used.]

OUT-LAST, v.t.

To last longer than something else; to exceed in duration. Candles laid in bran will outlast others of the same stuff. Bacon.

OUT-LAST-ED, pp.

Lasted longer than something else.

OUT'LAW, a. [Sax. utloga; out and law.]

A person excluded from the benefit of the law, or deprived of its protection. Formerly any person might kill an outlaw; but it is now held unlawful for any person to put to death an outlaw, except the sherif, who has a warrant for that purpose. Blackstone.

OUT'LAW, v.t. [Sax. utlagian.]

To deprive of the benefit and protection of law; to proscribe. Blackstone.

OUT'LAW-ED, pp.

Excluded from the benefit of law.

OUT'LAW-ING, ppr.

Depriving of the benefit of law.

OUT'LAW-RY, n.

The putting a man out of the protection of law, or the process by which a man is deprived of that protection; the punishment of a man who when called into court, contemptuously refuses to appear. Blackstone.

OUT'LAY, n.

A laying out or expending; expenditure.

OUT'LEAP, n.

Sally; flight; escape. Locke.

OUT-LEAP, v.t.

To leap beyond; to pass by leaping.

OUT-LEAP-ED, pp.

Leaped beyond.

OUT-LEAP-ING, ppr.

Leaping beyond.

OUT'LET, n.

Passage outward the place or the means by which any thing escapes or is discharged. A gate is the outlet of a city or fort. The mouth of a river is its outlet. Colonies are the outlets of a populous nation. Bacon.

OUT'LICK-ER, n.

In ships, a small piece of timber fastened to the top of the poop.

OUT-LIE, v.t.

To exceed in lying. Hall.

OUT'LI-ER, n.

  1. One who does not reside in the place with which his office or duty connects him. Frewen.
  2. A part lying without, or beyond the main body. Mantell.

OUT'LINE, n.

  1. Contour; the line by which a figure is defined; the exterior line.
  2. The first sketch of a figure.
  3. First general sketch of any scheme or design.

OUT'LINE, v.t.

To draw the exterior line; to delineate; to sketch.

OUT'LIN-ED, pp.

Marked with an outline.

OUT-LIVE, v.t. [outliv'.]

  1. To live beyond; to survive; to live after something has ceased; as, a man may outlive his children; a person may outlive his estate, his fame and his usefulness. They live too long who happiness outlive. Dryden.
  2. To live better or to better purpose. Scott.

OUT-LIV'ED, pp.

Survived; lived beyond.