Dictionary: O-VER-PAINT' – O-VER-POW'ER-ING

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O-VER-PAINT', v.t.

To color or describe too strongly. Hill.

O-VER-PASS', v.t.

  1. To cross; to go over. Dryden.
  2. To overlook; to pass without regard. Milton. Hooker.
  3. To omit, as in reckoning. Ralegh.
  4. To omit; not to receive or include. Hooker.

O-VER-PASS'ED, or O-VER-PAST, pp.

Passed by; paused away; gone; past. Shak.

O-VER-PAS'SION-ATE, a.

Passionate to excess.

O-VER-PAS'SION-ATE-LY, adv.

With too much passion.

O-VER-PA'TIENT, a.

Patient to excess.

O-VER-PAY', v.t.

  1. To pay too much or more than is due.
  2. To reward beyond the price or merit. Prior.

O-VER-PEER', v.t.

To overlook; to hover over. [Not used.] Shak.

O-VER-PEO'PLE, v.t.

To overstock with inhabitants. Johnson.

O-VER-PEO'PLED, pp.

Overstocked with inhabitants.

O-VER-PERCH', v.t.

To perch over or above; to fly over.

O-VER-PER'EMP-TO-RY, a.

Too peremptory.

O-VER-PER-SUADE', v.t.

To persuade or influence against one's inclination or opinion. Pope.

O-VER-PER-SUAD'ED, pp.

Influenced beyond one's inclination or opinion.

O-VER-PIC'TURE, v.t.

To exceed the representation or picture. Shak.

O'VER-PLUS, n. [over and L. plus, more, or perhaps G. ├╝berfluss, overflow.]

Surplus; that which remains after a supply, or beyond a quantity proposed. Take what is wanted and return the overplus. It would look like a fable to report that this gentleman gives away all which is the overplus of a great fortune. Addison.

O-VER-PLY', v.t.

To ply to excess; to exert with too much vigor. Milton.

O-VER-POISE', n. [overpoiz'.]

Preponderant weight. Dryden.

O-VER-POISE', v. [overpoiz'.]

To outweigh. Brown.

O-VER-POL'ISH, v.t.

To polish too much. Blackwell.

O-VER-POND'ER-OUS, a.

Too heavy; too depressing. Milton.

O-VER-POST', v.t.

To hasten over quickly.

O-VER-POW'ER, v.t.

  1. To affect with a power or force that can not be borne; as, the light overpowers the eyes.
  2. To vanquish by force; to subdue; to reduce to silence in action or submission; to defeat. Dryden. Watts.

O-VER-POW'ER-ED, pp.

Vanquished by superior force.

O-VER-POW'ER-ING, ppr.

Subduing; reducing to submission.