Dictionary: A-MAL'GAM-ATE – AM-AUR-O'SIS

a | b | c | d | e | f | g | h | i | j | k | l | m | n | o | p | q | r | s | t | u | v | w | x | y | z |

1234567891011121314151617181920
2122232425262728293031323334353637383940
4142434445464748495051525354555657585960
6162636465666768697071727374757677787980
81828384858687888990919293949596979899100
101102103104105106107108109110111112113114115116117118119120
121122123124125126127128129130131132133134135136137138139140
141142143144145146147148149150151152153154155156157158159160
161162163164165166167168169170171172173174175176177178179180
181182183184185186187188189190191192193194195196197198199200
201202203204205206207208209210211212213214215216217218219220
221222223224225226

A-MAL'GAM-ATE, v.i.

To compound or unite in an amalgam; to blend.

A-MAL'GAM-ATE, v.t.

  1. To compound quicksilver with another metal. Gregory uses amalgamize.
  2. To mix different things, to make a compound; to unite.

A-MAL'GAM-A-TED, pp.

Compounded with quicksilver; blended.

A-MAL'GAM-A-TING, ppr.

Compounding quicksilver with another metal.

A-MAL-GAM-A'TION, n.

  1. The act or operation of compounding mercury with another metal. – Encyc.
  2. The mixing or blending of different things.

AM'A-LOZK, n.

A large aquatic fowl of Mexico. – Dict. of Nat. Hist.

A-MAN'DO-LA, n.

A green marble, having the appearance of honey-comb, and containing white spots; of 100 parts, 76 are mild calcarious earth, 20 shist and 2 iron. The cellular appearance proceeds from the shist. – Kirwan. Nicholson.

A-MAN-U-EN'SIS, n. [L. from manus, hand.]

A person whose employment is to write what another dictates.

AM'A-RANTH, or AM-A-RAN'TUS, n. [Gr. αμαραντος, of α neg. and μαραινω, to decay; so called, it is said, because, when cropped, it does not soon wither.]

Flower-gentle; a genus of plants, of many species. Of these the tricolored has long been cultivated in gardens, on account of the beauty of its variegated leaves. – Encyc.

AM'A-RANTH, n.

A color inclining to purple. – Cyc.

AM-A-RANTH'INE, a.

Belonging to amaranth; consisting of, containing, or resembling amaranth.

A-MAR'I-TUDE, n. [L. amaritudo, from amarus, bitter; from Heb. מר, bitter.]

Bitterness. [Not much used.]

AM-A-RYL'LIS, n. [The name of a country girl in Theocritus and Virgil.]

In botany, lily-daffodil, a genus of liliaceous plants of several species, which are cultivated in gardens for the beauty of their flowers. – Encyc.

A-MASS', n.

An assemblage, heap or accumulation. [This is superseded by Mass.]

A-MASS', v.t. [Fr. amasser; It. ammassare; L. massa, a heap or lump; Gr. μαζα. See Mass.]

  1. To collect into a heap; to gather a great quantity; to accumulate; as, to amass a treasure.
  2. To collect in great numbers; to add many things together; as, to amass words or phrases.

A-MASS'ED, pp.

Collected in a heap, or in a great quantity or number; accumulated.

A-MASS'ING, ppr.

Collecting in a heap, or in a large quantity or number.

A-MASS'MENT, n.

A heap collected; a large quantity or number brought together; an accumulation.

A-MATE', v.i. [See Mate.]

To accompany; also to terrify, to perplex. [Not used.]

AM-A-TEUR', n. [Fr., from L. amator, a lover, from amo, to love.]

A person attached to a particular pursuit, study or science, as to music or painting; one who has a taste for the arts. – Burke.

AM'A-TIVE-NESS, n.

Propensity to love.

AM-A-TO'RI-AL, or AM'A-TO-RY, a. [L. amatorius, from amo, to love.]

  1. Relating to love; amatorial verses; causing love; as, amatory potions; produced by sexual intercourse; as, amotorial progeny. – Darwin.
  2. In anatomy, a term applied to the oblique muscles of the eye, from their use in ogling.

AM-A-TO'RI-AL-LY, adv.

In an amatorial manner; by way of love. – Darwin.

AM-A-TO'RI-OUS, a.

Pertaining to love. – Milton.

AM-AUR-O'SIS, n. [Gr. αμαυρος, obscure.]

A loss or decay of sight from a palsy of the optic nerve, without any visible defect in the eye, except an immovable pupil; called also gutta serena. Sometimes the disease is periodical, coming on suddenly, continuing for hours or days, and then disappearing. It has sometimes been cured by electricity. – Encyc. Coxe.