Dictionary: AD-MON'I-TIVE – A-DOP'TER

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AD-MON'I-TIVE, a.

Containing admonition. – Barrow.

AD-MON'I-TIVE-LY, adv.

By admonition.

AD-MON'I-TOR, n.

An admonisher, a monitor.

AD-MON'I-TO-RY, a.

Containing admonition; that admonishes.

AD-MORT-I-ZA'TION, n.

The reducing of lands or tenements to mortmain. [See Mortmain.] – Encyc.

AD-MOVE', v.t. [L. admoveo.]

To move to; to bring one thing to another. [Little used.] – Brown.

AD-NAS'CENT, a. [L. ad and nascens, growing.]

Growing on something else. – Evelyn.

AD-NA'TA, n. [L. ad and natus, grown, from nascor, to grow.]

  1. In anatomy, one of the coats of the eye, which is also called albuginea, and is sometimes confounded with the conjunctiva. It lies between the sclerotica and the conjunctiva.
  2. Such parts of animal or vegetable bodies, as are usual and natural, as the hair, wool, horns; or accidental, as fungus, misletoe, and excrescences.
  3. Offsets of plants, germinating under ground, as from the lily, narcissus, and hyacinth. – Quincy. Encyc.

AD'NATE, a. [L. ad and natus, grown.]

In botany, pressing close to the stem, or growing to it. – Martyn.

AD'NOUN, n. [ad and noun.]

In grammar, an adjective, or attribute. [Little used.]

AD-NU'BI-LA-TED, a.

Clouded; obscured.

A-DO', n. [Qu. a and do.]

Bustle; trouble; labor; difficulty; as, to make a great ado about trifles; to persuade one with much ado.

AD-O-LES'CENCE, n. [L. adolescens, growing, of ad and olesco, to grow, from oleo. Heb. עלה, to ascend; Ar. عَلَا, to be high.]

The state of growing, applied to the young of the human race; youth, or the period of life between childhood and manhood.

AD-O-LES'CENT, a.

Growing; advancing from childhood to manhood.

AD-O-NE'AN, a.

Pertaining to Adonis. Fair Adonean Venus. – Faber.

A-DO'NI-A, n.

Festivals celebrated anciently in honor of Adonis, by females, who spent two days in lamentations and infamous pleasures. – Encyc.

A-DON'IC, a.

Adonic verse, a short verse, in which the death of Adonis was bewailed. It consists of a dactyl and spondee or trochee. – Bailey. Cyc.

A-DON'IC, n.

An Adonic verse. Among the Anglo-Saxons, a poetic verse consisting of one long, two short and two long syllables. – Henry's Brit. 2, 383.

A-DO'NIS, n.

In mythology, the favorite of Venus, said to be the son of Cinyras, king of Cyprus. He was fond of hunting, and received a mortal wound from the tusk of a wild boar. Venus lamented his death, and changed him into the flower, anemony.

A-DO'NIS, n.

In botany, bird's eye or pheasant's eye.

A-DO'NISTS, n. [Heb. Ch. and Syr. אדון Adon; Lord, a scriptural title of the Supreme Being.]

Among critics, a sect or party who maintain that the Hebrew points ordinarily annexed to the consonants of the word Jehovah, are not the natural points belonging to that word, and that they do not express the true pronunciation of it; but that they are vowel points belonging to the words, Adonai and Elohim, applied to the ineffable name Jehovah, which the Jews were forbid to utter, and the true pronunciation of which was lost; they were therefore always to pronounce the word Adonai, instead of Jehovah. – Encyc.

A-DOPT', v.t. [L. adopto, of ad and opto, to desire or choose. See Option.]

  1. To take a stranger into one's family, as son and heir; to take one who is not a child, and treat him as one, giving him a title to the privileges and rights of a child.
  2. In a spiritual sense, to receive the sinful children of men into the invisible church, and into God's favor and protection, by which they become heirs of salvation by Christ. – Brown.
  3. To take or receive as one's own, that which is not naturally so; as, to adopt the opinions of another; or to receive that which is new; as, to adopt a particular mode of husbandry.
  4. To select and take; as, which mode will you adopt?

A-DOPT'ED, pp.

Taken as one's own; received as son and heir; selected for use.

A-DOPT'ED-LY, adv.

In the manner of something adopted.

A-DOP'TER, n.

  1. One who adopts.
  2. In chimistry, a large round receiver, with two necks, diametrically opposite to each other, one of which admits the neck of a retort, and the other is joined to another receiver. It is used in distillations, to give more space to elastic vapors, or to increase the length of the neck of a retort.