Dictionary: AM'BLY-GON – AM'BUS-CADE

a | b | c | d | e | f | g | h | i | j | k | l | m | n | o | p | q | r | s | t | u | v | w | x | y | z |

1234567891011121314151617181920
2122232425262728293031323334353637383940
4142434445464748495051525354555657585960
6162636465666768697071727374757677787980
81828384858687888990919293949596979899100
101102103104105106107108109110111112113114115116117118119120
121122123124125126127128129130131132133134135136137138139140
141142143144145146147148149150151152153154155156157158159160
161162163164165166167168169170171172173174175176177178179180
181182183184185186187188189190191192193194195196197198199200
201202203204205206207208209210211212213214215216217218219220
221222223224225226

AM'BLY-GON, n. [Gr. αμβλος, obtuse, and γωνια, an angle.]

An obtuse angled triangle; a triangle with one angle of more than ninety degrees. – Bailey. Encyc.

AM-BLYG'O-NAL, a.

Containing an obtuse angle. – Ash.

AM-BLYG'O-NITE, n. [Gr. αμβλυγωνιος, having an obtuse angle.]

A greenish colored mineral, of different pale shades, marked on the surface with reddish and yellowish brown spots. It occurs massive or crystalized in oblique four-sided prisms, in granite, with topaz and tourmalin, in Saxony. – Ure.

AM'BLY-O-PY, n. [Gr. αμβλυς, dull, and ωψ, eye.]

Incipient amaurosis; dullness or obscurity of sight, without any apparent defect of the organs; sight so depraved that objects can be seen only in a certain light, distance, or position. – Encyc. Coxe.

AM'BO, n. [Gr. αμβων, a pulpit; L. umbo, a boss.]

A reading-desk, or pulpit. – Wheler.

AM-BRE-A'DA, n. [from amber.]

A kind of factitious amber, which the Europeans sell to the Africans. – Encyc.

AM-BRE'IC-AC'ID, n. [AM-BRE'IC AC'ID.]

An acid formed by digesting ambreine in nitric acid.

AM-BRE'INE, n.

One of the proximate principles and the chief constituent of ambergris.

AM-BRO'SIA, n. [ambro'zha; Gr. α neg. and βροτος, mortal, because it was supposed to confer immortality on them that fed on it.]

  1. In heathen antiquity, the imaginary food of the gods. Hence,
  2. Whatever is very pleasing to the taste or smell. The name has also been given to certain alexipharmac compositions.
  3. A genus of plants.

AM-BRO'SI-AC, a.

Having the qualities of ambrosia.

AM-BRO'SIAL-LY, adv.

In an ambrosial way.

AM'BRO-SIAN, a.

Pertaining to St. Ambrose. The Ambrosian office, or ritual, is a formula of worship in the church of Milan, instituted by St. Ambrose in the fourth century. – Encyc.

AM-BRO'SIAN, a. [ambro'zhal.]

Partaking of the nature or qualities of ambrosia; fragrant; delighting the taste or smell; as, ambrosial dews. Ben Jonson uses ambrosiac in a like sense, and Bailey has ambrosian, but these seem not to be warranted by usage.

AM'BRO-SIN, n.

In the middle ages, a coin struck by the dukes of Milan, on which St. Ambrose was represented on horseback, with a whip in his right hand. – Encyc.

AM'BRY, n. [Contracted from Fr. aumonerie, almonry, from old Fr. almoigne, alms.]

  1. An almonry; a place where alms are deposited for distribution to the poor. In ancient abbeys and priories there was an office of this name, in which the almoner lived.
  2. A place in which are deposited the utensils for housekeeping; also, a cupboard; a place for cold victuals.

AMBS'-ACE, n. [L. ambo, both, and ace.]

A double ace, as when two dice turn up the ace. Johnson.

AM'BU-LANT, a. [L. ambulans, from ambulo.]

Walking; moving from place to place. – Encyc. Ambulant brokers, in Amsterdam, are exchange-brokers or, agents, who are not sworn, and whose testimony is not received in courts of justice. – Encyc.

AM'BU-LATE, v.t.

To walk; to move backward and forward.

AM-BU-LA'TION, n. [L. ambulatio.]

A walking about; the act of walking.

AM'BU-LA-TIVE, a.

Walking.

AM'BU-LA-TOR, n.

In entomology, a species of Lamia, whose thorax is armed on each side with two spines; a Cerambyx of Linnæus. – Cyc.

AM'BU-LA-TO-RY, a.

  1. That has the power or faculty of walking; as, an animal is ambulatory.
  2. Pertaining to a walk; as, an ambulatory view.
  3. Moving from place to place; not stationary; as, an ambulatory court, which exercises its jurisdiction in different places. – Johnson.

AM'BU-LA-TO-RY, n.

A species of ichneumon, with a yellowish scutellum and spotted thorax. – Cyc.

AM'BU-RY, or AN'BU-RY, n. [Qu. L. umbo, the navel; Gr. αμβων.]

Among farriers, a tumor, wart or swelling on a horse, full of blood and soft to the touch. – Encyc.

AM'BUS-CADE, n. [Fr. embuscade; Sp. and Port. emboscada; It. imboscata; from It. imboscare, Sp. emboscar, to lie in bushes, or concealed; in and bosco, bosque, a wood; Eng. bush.]

  1. Literally, a lying in a wood, concealed, for the purpose of attacking an enemy by surprise: hence, a lying in wait, and concealed in any situation, for a like purpose.
  2. A private station in which troops lie concealed, with a view to attack their enemy by surprise; ambush.