Dictionary: AC-CU'SA-BLE – A-CEPH'A-LI

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AC-CU'SA-BLE, a.

That may be accused; chargeable with a crime; blamable; liable to censure; followed by of.

AC-CU'SANT, n.

One who accuses. – Hall.

AC-CU-SA'TION, n.

  1. The act of charging with a crime or offense; the act of accusing of any wrong or injustice.
  2. The charge of an offense or crime; or the declaration containing the charge. They set over his head his accusation. – Matt. xxvii.

AC-CU'SA-TIVE, a.

A term given to a case of nouns, in Grammars, on which the action of a verb terminates or falls; called in English grammar the objective case.

AC-CU'SA-TIVE-LY, adv.

  1. In an accusative manner.
  2. In relation to the accusative case in grammar.

AC-CU'SA-TO-RY, a.

Accusing; containing an accusation; as, an accusatory libel.

AC-CUSE', v.t. [s as z; L. accuso, to blame, or accuse; ad and causor, to blame, or accuse; causa, blame, suit, or process, cause; Fr. accuser; Sp. acusar; Port. accusar; It. accusare; Arm. accusi. The sense is, to attack, to drive against, to charge or to fall upon. See Cause.]

  1. To charge with, or declare to have committed a crime, either by plaint, or complaint, information, indictment, or impeachment; to charge with an offense against the laws, judicially or by a public process; as, to accuse one of a high crime or misdemeanor.
  2. To charge with a fault; to blame. Their thoughts, in the meanwhile, accusing or else excusing one another. – Rom. ii. It is followed by of before the subject of accusation; the use of for after this verb is illegitimate.

AC-CUS'ED, pp.

Charged with a crime, by a legal process; charged with an offense; blamed.

AC-CUS'ER, n.

One who accuses or blames; an officer who prefers an accusation against another for some offense, in the name of the government, before a tribunal that has cognizance of the offense.

AC-CUS'ING, ppr.

Charging with a crime; blaming.

AC-CUS'TOM, n.

Custom. [Not used.]. – Milton.

AC-CUS'TOM, v.i.

  1. To be wont, or habituated to do any thing. [Little used.]
  2. To cohabit. [Not used.] – Milton.

AC-CUS'TOM, v.t. [Fr. accoutumer, from ad and coutume, coustume, custom. See Custom.]

To make familiar by use; to form a habit by practice; to habituate or inure; as, to accustom one's self to a spare diet.

AC-CUS'TOM-A-BLE, a.

Of long custom; habitual; customary. [Little used.]

AC-CUS'TOM-A-BLY, adv.

According to custom or habit. [Little used.]

AC-CUS'TOM-ANCE, n.

Custom; habitual use or practice. [Not used.] – Boyle.

AC-CUS'TOM-A-RI-LY, adv.

According to custom or common practice. [See Customarily.] [Little used.]

AC-CUS'TOM-A-RY, a.

Usual; customary. [See Customary.] [Little used.]

AC-CUS'TOM-ED, pp.

  1. Being familiar by use; habituated; inured.
  2. adj. Usual; often practiced; as, in their accustomed manner.

AC-CUS'TOM-ING, ppr.

Making familiar by practice; inuring.

ACE, n. [L. as, a unit or pound; Fr. as; It. asso; D. aas; G. ass; Sp. as.]

  1. A unit; a single point on a card or die; or the card or die so marked.
  2. A very small quantity; a particle; an atom; a trifle; as, a creditor will not abate an ace of his demand.

A-CEL'DA-MA, n. [Ch. חקל, a field, and דמא, Ch. Syr. and Sam., blood.]

A field said to have lain south of Jerusalem, the same as the potter's field, purchased with the bribe which Judas took for betraying his master, and therefore called the field of blood. It was appropriated to the interment of strangers.

A-CEPH'A-LA, n. [plur. Gr. ακεφαλος.]

A class of molluscous animals, comprehending those which have no head; as the oyster and muscle. – Bell.

A-CEPH'A-LA, n. [plur.]

Molluscan animals having no head, as the oyster and muscle. – Bell.

A-CEPH'A-LI, n. [G. α and κεφαλη.]

A sect of levelers who acknowledged no chief or head.