Dictionary: A-BRA-HAM'IC – A-BRO'TA-NUM

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A-BRA-HAM'IC, a.

Pertaining to Abraham, the patriarch, as Abrahamic Covenant. – Mason.

A-BRAN'CHIA, n.

An order of animals having no branchite, as the leech. – Career.

A-BRA'SION, n. [abra'zhun.]

The act of wearing or rubbing off; also substance worn off by attrition. – Quincy.

AB'RA-ZITE, n. [G. α neg. and βραζω, to bubble.]

A mineral that does not effervesce before the blow-pipe. See Gismondin. – Shepard.

AB-RA-ZIT'IC, a.

In mineralogy, not effervescing when melted before the blow-pipe. – Shepard.

A-BREAST', adv. [abrest'; from a and breast.]

  1. Side by side; with the breasts in a line. Two men rode abreast.
  2. In marine language, ships are abreast when their heads are equally advanced; and they are abreast of objects when the objects are on a line with the beam. Hence,
  3. Opposite; against; on a line with – as, a ship was abreast of Montauk point. – A seaman's phrase.

AB-RE-NUN-CI-A'TION, n.

Renunciation; absolute denial. [Not used.] – Mede.

AB-REP'TION, n. [L. abripio.]

A carrying away; or state of being seized and carried away.

A-BREU-VOIR', n. [Fr. abreuvoir, a watering place, from abreuver, to water; Sp. abrevar, id. from Gr. βρεχω.]

Among masons, the joint between stones, to be filled with mortar.

A-BRIDGE', v.t. [abridj'; Fr. abréger, from Gr. βραχυς, short, or its root, from the root of break or a verb of that family.]

  1. To make shorter; to epitomize; to contract by using fewer words, yet retaining the sense in substance-used of writings; as, Justin abridged the history of Trojius Pompeius.
  2. To lessen; to diminish; as, to abridge labor; to abridge power or rights. – Smith.
  3. To deprive; to cut oil from; followed by of; as, to abridge one of his rights, or enjoyments. To abridge from, is now obsolete or improper.
  4. In algebra, to reduce a compound quantity or equation to its more simple expression. The equation thus abridged is called a formula.

A-BRIDG'ED, pp.

Made shorter; epitomized; reduced to a smaller compass; lessened; deprived.

A-BRIDG'ER, n.

One who abridges; one who makes a compend.

A-BRIDG'ING, ppr.

Shortening; lessening; depriving; debarring.

A-BRIDG'MENT, n.

  1. An epitome; a compend or summary of a book.
  2. Diminution; contraction; reduction – as, an abridgment of expenses.
  3. Deprivation; a debarring or restraint; as, an abridgment of pleasures.

A-BROACH', adv. [See Broach.]

Broached; letting out or yielding liquor, or in a posture for letting out; as, a cask is abroach. Figuratively used by Shakspeare for setting loose, or in a state of being diffused, "Set mischief abroach;" but this sense is unusual.

A-BROAD', adv. [abrawd'; See Broad. In a general sense, at large; widely; not confined to narrow limits. Hence,]

  1. In the open air.
  2. Beyond or out of the walls of a house, as to walk abroad.
  3. Beyond the limits of a camp. – Deut. xxiii. 10.
  4. Beyond the bounds of a country; in foreign countries; as, to go abroad for an education; we have broils at home and enemies abroad.
  5. Extensively; before the public at large. He began to blaze abroad the matter. – Mark 1:45. Esther i.
  6. Widely; with expansion; as, a tree spreads its branches abroad.

AB'RO-GATE, v.t. [L. abrogo to repeal; from ab and rogo, to ask or propose. See the English reach. Class Rg.]

To repeal; to annul by an authoritative act; to abolish by the authority of the maker or his successor; applied to the repeal of laws, decrees, ordinances, the abolition of established customs, &c.

AB'RO-GA-TED, pp.

Repealed; annulled by an act of authority.

AB'RO-GA-TING, ppr.

Repealing by authority; making void.

AB-RO-GA'TION, n.

The act of abrogating; repeal by authority of the legislative power.

A-BROOD', adv. [See Brood.]

In the action of brooding. [Not in use.] – Sancroft.

A-BROOD'ING, n.

A sitting abrood. [Not in use.] – Basset.

A-BROOK', v.t.

To brook, to endure. [Not in use.] See Brook. – Shak.

AB-RO-TA-NOID', n. [Gr. αβροτονον and ειδος, form.]

A species of perforated coral or madrepore growing on rocks on the bottom of the sea.

A-BRO'TA-NUM, n. [Gr. αβροτονον.]

A species of evergreen plant arranged under the genus Artemisia, called also Southernwood.