Dictionary: A-E-ROG'RA-PHY – AE-TI-OL'O-GY

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A-E-ROG'RA-PHY, n. [Gr. αηρ, air, and γραφω, to describe.]

A description of the air or atmosphere; but aerology is chiefly used.

A'ER-O-LITE, n. [Gr. αηρ, air, and λιθος, a stone.]

A stone falling from the air, or atmospheric regions; a meteoric stone. – Guidotte. Med. Rep.

A-ER-O-LOG'IC-AL, a.

Pertaining to aerology.

A-ER-OL'O-GIST, n.

One who is versed in aerology.

A-ER-OL'O-GY, n. [Gr. αηρ, air, and λογος, description.]

A description of the air; that branch of philosophy which treats of the air, its constituent parts, properties, and phenomena. – Encyc.

A'ER-O-MAN-CY, n. [Gr. αηρ, and μαντεια, divination.]

Divination by means of the air and winds.

A-ER-OM'E-TER, n. [Gr. αηρ, air, and μετρον, measure.]

  1. An instrument for weighing air, or for ascertaining the mean bulk of gases. – Journ. of Science.
  2. An instrument for ascertaining the density or rarity of air. Morin.

A-ER-OM'E-TRY, n. [as above.]

The science of measuring the air, including the doctrine of its pressure, elasticity, rarefaction, and condensation. – Encyc. Rather, aerometry is the art or science of ascertaining the mean bulk of the gases. – Encyc. Ure.

A'ER-O-NAUT, n. [Gr. αηρ, and ναυτης, a sailor, from ναυς, a ship.]

One who sails or floats in the air, an aerial navigator; applied to persons who ascend in air balloons. – Burke.

A-ER-O-NAUT'IC, a.

Sailing or floating in the air; pertaining to aerial sailing.

A-ER-O-NAUT'ICS, n.

The doctrine, science, or art of sailing in the air, by means of a balloon.

A'ER-O-NAUT-ISM, n.

The practice of ascending and floating in the atmosphere, in balloons. – Journ. of Science.

A'ER-O-PHYTE, n. [Gr. αηρ and φυτον, a plant.]

A plant that lives exclusively in air, in distinction from a hydrophyte.

A-E-RO-SCEP'SY, n. [Gr. αηρ and σκεπτομαι, to explore.]

The faculty of perception by the medium of the air, supposed to reside in the antennæ of insects.

A-ER-OS'CEP-SY, or A-ER-OS'CO-PY, n. [Gr. αηρ and σκεπτομαι, to see.]

The observation or perception of the air.

A'ER-O-SITE, n. [See Red-silver.]

A'ER-O-STAT, n. [Gr. αηρ, and στατος, sustaining, from ιστημι, to stand.]

A machine or vessel sustaining weights in the air; a name given to air balloons. – Encyc.

A-ER-O-STAT'IC, a.

Suspending in air; pertaining to the art of aerial navigation.

A-E-RO-STAT'ICS, n.

The science of aerial navigation.

A-ER-OS-TA'TION, n.

  1. Aerial navigation; the science of raising, suspending, and guiding machines in the air, or of ascending in air balloons. – Adams.
  2. The science of weighing air.

A'E-RY-LIGHT, a.

In Milton, light as air; used for airy light.

AES-THET'ICS, or ES-THET'ICS, n. [ÆS-THET'ICS; Gr. αισθητικος.]

In the fine arts, that science which derives the first principles in all arts from the effect which certain combinations have on the mind, as connected with nature and right reason. It is intimately related to sentiment. – Brande.

AES-TI-VA'TION, n. [ÆS-TI-VA'TION. See ESTIVATION.]

A-E-THE-OG'A-MOUS, a. [Gr. αηθης, unusual, and γαμος, marriage.]

A word intended to express the unusual mode of propagation among the cryptogamic plants, on the supposition that this mode is not hidden, but unusual. – Brande.

AE-TI-OL'O-GY, n. [Æ-TI-OL'O-GY; 1841 Addenda only. See ETIOLOGY.]