Dictionary: AR'BOR-IZE – ARCH-A-ISM

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AR'BOR-IZE, v.t.

To form the appearance of a tree or plant in minerals.

AR'BOR-VINE, n.

A species of bind-weed.

AR-BUS-CLE, n. [L. arbusculus, a little tree.]

A dwarf tree, in size between a shrub and a tree. – Bradley.

AR-BUS'CULAR, a.

Resembling a shrub; having the figure of small trees. – Da Costa.

AR-BUST'IVE, a. [From arbustum.]

Containing copses of trees or shrubs; covered with shrubs. Bartram.

AR-BUST'UM, n. [L. See Arbor.]

A copse of shrubs or trees; an orchard.

AR'BUTE, n. [L. arbutus.]

The strawberry tree.

AR-BU'TE-AN, a.

Pertaining to the strawberry tree. – Encyc. Evelyn.

ARC, n. [L. arcus, a bow, vault, or arch; arcuo, to bend; Gr. αρχη, beginning, origin; αρχω, to begin, to be the author or chief; Fr. arc, arche; Sp. arco, a bow and arch; Port. id.; It. id.; Arm. goarec. The Greek word has a different application, but is probably from the same root as arcus, from the sense of springing or stretching, shooting up, rising, which gives the sense of a vault, or bow, as well as of chief or head. Hebrew, ארג, to weave; Syriac, ܐܪܓ to desire, or long for; Ar. أَرِجَ aricha, ariga, to emit odor, to diffuse fragrance; and Heb. ערג, to desire, or long for, to ascend; Eth. ዐረገ to ascend, to mount; Ar. id. The radical sense of all these roots is, to stretch, strain, reach; Gr. ορεγω; L. fragro; and the sense of arch is from stretching upward, ascending. From arc or arch comes the sense of bending, deviating, and cunning.]

In geometry, any part of the circumference of a circle, or curved line, lying from one point to another; a segment, or part of a circle, not more than a semicircle. – Encyc. Johnson.

AR-CADE', n. [Fr. from arcus; Sp. arcada.]

A long and continued arch; a walk arched above. – Johnson.

AR-CA'DI-AN, or AR-CA'DIC, a.

Pertaining to Arcadia, a mountainous district in the heart of the Peloponnesus. – Trans. of Pausanias.

AR-CA'DICS, n.

The title of a book in Pausanias, which treats of Arcadia. – Trans. B. 8.

AR-CANE', a. [L. arcanus.]

Hidden, secret. [Not much used.] – Trans. of Pausanias.

AR-CA'NUM, n. [plur. arcana. L. perhaps from arceo, to keep in.]

A secret; generally used in the plural, arcana, secret things, mysteries.

ARC-BOU'TANT, n. [Fr. arc and bout. See About, Abutment.]

In building, an arched buttress. – Encyc.

ARCH, a.

Used also in composition. [Gr. αρχος, chief; Ir. arg, noble, famous.] Chief; of the first class; principal; as, an arch deed. – Shak. Shakspeare uses this word as a noun; “My worthy arch and patrons;” but the use is not authorized.

ARCH, a. [It. arcare, to bend, to arch, to cheat or deceive, from arco, L. arcus, a bow; G. arg, cunning, arch, bad; It. arg, crafty, roguish; Sw. and Dan. arg, id. The Teutonic arg, appears to be allied to arch, and to be the Eng. rogue. This circumstance, and the Arm. goarec, (see Arc,) indicate that the radical letters in arc, arch, αρχη, are Rg. The radical sense of bend is to strain.]

Cunning; sly; shrewd; waggish; mischievous for sport; mirthful; as we say in popular language, roguish; as, an arch lad.

ARCH, n. [See Arc.]

  1. A segment or part of a circle. A concave or hollow structure of stone or brick, supported by its own curve. It may be constructed of wood, and supported by the mechanism of the work. This species of structure's much used in bridges. A vault is properly a broad arch. – Encyc.
  2. The space between two piers of a bridge, when arched; or any place covered with an arch.
  3. Any curvature in the form of an arch.
  4. The vault of heaven, or sky. – Shak. Triumphal arches are magnificent structures at the entrance of cities, erected to adorn a triumph and perpetuate the memory of the event.

ARCH, v.i.

To make an arch or arches; as, to arch beneath the sand. – Pope.

ARCH, v.t.

To cover with an arch; to form with a curve; as, to arch a gate.

ARCH-A-BOM-IN-A'TION, n.

Chief abomination. – Everett.

ARCH-AI-O-LOG'IC-AL, a.

Relating to archaiology.

ARCH-AI-OL'O-GIST, n.

One versed in antiquity, or ancient learning.

AR-CHAI-OL'O-GY, n.

A discourse on antiquity; learning; pertaining to antiquity.

ARCH-A-ISM, n. [Gr. αρχαιος, ancient, from αρχη, beginning.]

An ancient or obsolete phrase or expression. – Watts.