Dictionary: AN-TI-SCRIP'TUR-ISM – AN-TI-TRIN-I-TA'RIAN

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AN-TI-SCRIP'TUR-ISM, n.

Opposition to the Holy Scriptures. – Boyle.

AN-TI-SCRIP'TUR-IST, n.

One that denies revelation. – Boyle.

AN-TI-SEP'TIC, a.

A medicine which resists or corrects putrefaction, as acids, saline substances, astringents, &c. – Encyc.

AN-TI-SEP'TIC, a. [Gr. αντι and σηπτος, putrid, from σηπω, to putrify.]

Opposing or counteracting putrefaction. – Ash.

AN-TI-SLAVE'RY, n.

Opposition to slavery.

AN-TI-SO'CIAL, a. [See Social.]

Averse to society; that tends to interrupt or destroy social intercourse. – Pascalis, Med. Rep.

AN-TISP'A-SIS, n. [Gr. αντι, against, and σπαω, to draw.]

A revulsion of fluids from one part of the body to another. Quincy.

AN-TI-SPAS-MOD'IC, a. [Gr. αντι, against, and σπασμος, from σπαω,to draw.]

Opposing spasm; resisting convulsions; as anodynes. – Coxe.

AN-TI-SPAS-MOD'IC, n.

A remedy for spasm or convulsions, as opium, balsam of Peru, and the essential oils of vegetables. – Coxe.

AN-TI-SPAS'TIC, a. [See Antispasis.]

Causing a revulsion of fluids or humors. – Johnson.

AN-TI-SPLEN'ET-IC, a. [See Spleen.]

Good as a remedy in diseases of the spleen. – Johnson.

AN-TIS'TA-SIS, n. [Gr. αντι, opposite, and στασις, station.]

In oratory, the defense of an action from the consideration that if it had been omitted, something worse would have happened. – Encyc.

AN-TIS'TES, n. [L.]

The chief priest or prelate. – Milton.

AN-TIS'TRO-PHE, or AN-TIS'TRO-PHY, n. [Gr. αντι, opposite, and στροφη, a turning.]

  1. In grammar, the changing of things mutually depending on each other; reciprocal conversion; as, the master of the servant, the servant of the master.
  2. Among the ancients, that part of a song or dance, before the altar, which was performed by turning from west to east, in opposition to the strophy. The ancient odes consisted of stanzas called strophies and antistrophies, to which was often added the epode. These were sung by a choir, which turned or changed places when they repeated the different parts of the ode. The epode was sung, as the chorus stood still. [See Ode.] – West's pref. to his Pindar.

AN-TIS'TRO-PHON, n.

A figure which repeats a word often. Milton.

AN-TI-STRU-MAT'IC, or AN-TI-STRU'MOUS, a. [anti and struma, a scrofulous swelling.]

Good against scrofulous disorders. – Johnson. Wiseman.

AN-TI-SYN-O-DA'LI-AN, n.

One who opposes synodals. – N. E. Elders.

AN'TI-THE-ISM, n. [Gr. αντι and θεος.]

Opposition to the belief of a God. – Chalmers.

AN'TI-THE-IST, n.

One who opposes the belief of a God.

AN-TI-THE-IST'IC-AL, a.

Opposing the belief of a God.

AN-TI-THE-IST'IC-AL-LY, adv.

By opposing the belief in a God.

AN-TITH'E-SIS, n. [Gr. αντιθεσις, of αντι and θεσις, from τιθημι, to place.]

  1. In rhetoric, an opposition of words or sentiments; contrast; as, “When our vices leave us, we flatter ourselves we leave them.” “The prodigal robs his heir, the miser robs himself.” “Excess of ceremony shows want of breeding.” “Liberty with laws, and government without oppression.”
  2. Opposition of opinions; controversy. – Encyc.

AN-TI-THET'IC, or AN-TI-THET'IC-AL, a.

Pertaining to antithesis, or opposition of words and sentiments; containing or abounding with antithesis. – Enfield. Encyc.

AN-TI-THET'IC-AL-LY, adv.

By antithesis. – Byron.

AN-TI-TRIN-I-TA'RIAN, a.

Opposing the trinity.