Dictionary: AN'GER – AN'GLI-FI-ED

a | b | c | d | e | f | g | h | i | j | k | l | m | n | o | p | q | r | s | t | u | v | w | x | y | z |

1234567891011121314151617181920
2122232425262728293031323334353637383940
4142434445464748495051525354555657585960
6162636465666768697071727374757677787980
81828384858687888990919293949596979899100
101102103104105106107108109110111112113114115116117118119120
121122123124125126127128129130131132133134135136137138139140
141142143144145146147148149150151152153154155156157158159160
161162163164165166167168169170171172173174175176177178179180
181182183184185186187188189190191192193194195196197198199200
201202203204205206207208209210211212213214215216217218219220
221222223224225226

AN'GER, v.t.

  1. To excite anger; to provoke; to rouse resentment.
  2. To make painful; to cause to smart; to inflame; as, to anger an ulcer. – Bacon.

AN'GER-ED, pp.

Provoked; made angry.

AN'GER-LY, adv. [anger and like.]

In an angry manner; more generally written angrily.

AN-GI'NA, n. [L. from ango, to choke. See Anger.]

A quinsy; an inflammation of the throat; a tumor impeding respiration. It is a general name of the diseases called sore-throat, as quinsy, scarlet fever, croup, mumps, &c. – Coxe. Angina pectoris, an anomalous or spasmodic affection of the chest and organs of respiration, or a disease of the heart. – Coxe.

AN-GI-OG'RA-PHY, n. [Gr. αγγειον, a vessel, and γραφη, description.]

A description of the vessels in the human body. – Ash.

AN-GI-OL'O-GY, n. [Gr. αγγειον, a vessel, and λογος, discourse.]

A treatise or discourse on the vessels of the human body, as the arteries, veins, lymphatics &c. – Quincy.

AN'GI-O-MON-O-SPERM'OUS, n. [Gr. αγγειον, a vessel, μονος, alone, and σπερμα, seed.]

Producing one seed only in a pod. – Bailey. Johnson.

AN'GI-O-SCOPE, n. [Gr. αγγειον, a vessel, and σκοπεω, to view.]

An instrument for examining the capillary vessels of a body. – Morin.

AN'GI-O-SPERM, n. [Gr. αγγειον, a vessel, and σπερμα, seed.]

In botany, a plant which has its seeds inclosed in a pericarp.

AN-GI-O-SPERM'OUS, a.

Having seeds inclosed in a pod or other pericarp. In Linnæus's system, the second order of plants in the Didynamian class are called Angiospermia. This word is opposed to gymnospermous, or naked-seeded.

AN-GI-OT'O-MY, n. [Gr. αγγειον, a vessel; and τομη, a cutting.]

The opening of a vessel, whether a vein or an artery, as in bleeding. It includes both arteriotomy and phlebotomy.

AN'GLE, n.

A hook; an instrument to take fish, consisting of a rod, a line and a hook, or a line and hook.

AN'GLE, n. [Fr. angle; L. angulus, a corner; Gr. αγκυλος, W. ongle; G. and D. angel, a hook, an angle; Dan. angel, a hook, angle, a sting; Sax. angel, a hook; Sp. and Port. angulo; It. angolo. The German has angeln, for angling to with a hook; but in D. hengel is the rod, and hengelen, to angle. Qu. hinge and hang.]

In popular language, the point where two lines meet or the meeting of two lines in a point; a corner. In geometry, the space comprised between two straight lines that meet in a point, or between two straight converging lines which, if extended, would meet; or the quantity by which two straight lines, departing from a point, diverge from each other. The point of meeting is the vertex of the angle, and the lines, containing the angle, are its sides or legs. In optics, the angle of incidence is the angle which a ray of light makes with a perpendicular to the surface, or to that point of the surface on which it falls. The angle of refraction is the angle which a ray of light refracted makes with the surface of the refracting medium; or rather with a perpendicular to that point of the surface on which it falls. – Encyc. A right angle is one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90 degrees, making the quarter of a circle. An obtuse angle is greater than a right angle, or more than 90 degrees. An acute angle is less than a right angle, or less than 90 degrees. A rectilineal or right-lined angle is formed by two right lines. A curvilineal angle is formed by two curved lines. A mixed angle is formed by a right line with a curved line. Adjacent or contiguous angles are such as have one leg common to both angles, and both together are equal to two right angles. External angles are angles of any right-lined figure without it, when the sides are produced or lengthened. Internal angles are those which are within any right-lined figure. Oblique angles are either acute or obtuse, in opposition to right angles. A solid angle is the meeting of three or more plane angles at one point. A spherical angle is one made by the meeting of two arches of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of the globe or sphere. – Bailey.

AN'GLE, v.i.

  1. To fish with an angle, or with line and hook.
  2. v. t. or vi. To fish for; to try to gain by some bait or insinuation, as men angle for fish; as, to angle for the hearts of; people, or to angle hearts. – Shak. Sidney.

AN'GLED, a.

having angles: used only in compounds.

AN'GLER, n.

One that fishes with an angle; also a fish, a species of Lophius.

AN'GLE-ROD, n.

The rod or pole to which a line and hook are fastened.

AN'GLE-SITE, a.

Prismatic lead baryte. – Shepard.

AN'GLIC, or AN'GLI-CAN, a. [From Angles, Sax. ing, a plain or meadow, and lic, like, or εικος, like, which is the root of the L. icus, in publicus, and all similar adjectives. From ing, was formed Angles, the English, to which is added this common affix, ic. The Angles, were the Ingævones, of Tacitus, ing-woners, dwellers on the plain or level land, near the Elbe and Weser. (See English and Wont.) Ing is annexed to many English names, as Reading, Basing, Kettering, towns situated on flat land.]

English; pertaining to England or the English nation; as, the Anglican church. – Pinkerton.

AN'GLI-CE, adv. [L.]

In English, in the English manner.

AN'GLI-CISM, n.

An English idiom; a form of language peculiar to the English. – Milton.

AN'GLI-CIZE, v.t.

To make English; to render conformable to the English idiom, or to English analogies.

AN'GLI-CIZ-ED, pp.

Made English; rendered conformable to the English idiom.

AN'GLI-FI-CA'TION, n.

The act of converting into English.

AN'GLI-FI-ED, pp.

Made English.