Dictionary: A-CEPH'A-LOUS – A-CE-TI-FI-CA'TION

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A-CEPH'A-LOUS, a.

  1. In botany, applied to ovaries, the style of which springs from their base, instead of their apex.
  2. In anatomy, applied to a fetus having no head.

A-CEPH'A-LOUS, a. [Gr. α privative and κεφαλη, a head.]

Without a head, headless. In history, the term Acephali, or Acephalites, was given to several sects who refused to follow some noted leader, and to such bishops as were exempt from the jurisdiction and discipline of their patriarch. It was also given to certain levelers who acknowledged no head in the reign of Henry I. It was also applied to the Blemmyes, a pretended nation of Africa, and to other tribes in the East, whom ancient naturalists represented as having no head; their eyes and mouth being placed in other parts. Modern discoveries have dissipated these fictions. In English Laws, men who held lands of no particular lord, and clergymen who were under no bishop. – LL. Hen I. Cowel.

A-CEPH'A-LUS, n.

An obsolete name of the trenia or tapeworm, which was formerly supposed to have no head; an error now exploded. The term is also used to express a verse defective in the beginning.

ACE'-POINT, n.

The side of a die that has but one spot.

A-CERB', a. [L. acerbus; G. herbe, harsh, sour, tart, bitter, rough, whence herbst, autumn, herbstzeit, harvest time; D. herfst, harvest. See Harvest.]

Sour, bitter, and harsh to the taste; sour, with astringency or roughness; a quality of unripe fruits. – Quincy.

A-CERB'ATE, v.t.

To make sour, bitter or harsh to the taste.

A-CERB'A-TING, ppr.

Making sour.

A-CERB'I-TY, n.

  1. A sourness, with roughness, or astringency.
  2. Figuratively, harshness or severity of temper in man.

A-CER'IC, a. [L. acer, a maple-tree.]

Pertaining to the maple; obtained from the maple, as aceric acid. – Ure.

A-CER'I-DES, n. [plur.]

Plasters which have no wax. – Knowles.

AC'E-ROSE, a.

In botany, linear, rigid and tapering from a narrow base to a fine point; as the leaves of juniper, red cedar, &c.

AC'ER-OUS, a. [L. acerosus, chaffy, from acus, chaff or a point.]

  1. In botany, chaffy; resembling chaff.
  2. An acerous or acerose leaf is one which is linear and permanent, in form of a needle, as in pine. – Martyn.

A-CER'RA, n.

A vessel in which incense has been burnt. – Knowles.

A-CERV'AL, a.

Pertaining to a heap.

A-CERV'ATE, v.t.

To heap up.

A-CES'CEN-CY, n. [L. acescens, turning sour, from acesco. See Acid.]

A turning sour by spontaneous decomposition; a state of becoming sour, tart, or acid; and hence a being moderately sour.

A-CES'CENT, a.

Turning sour; becoming tart or acid by spontaneous decomposition. Hence slightly sour; but the latter sense is usually expressed by acidulous or sub-acid. – Nicholson.

A-CES'TE, n.

In entomology, a species of papilio or butterfly, with subdentated wings, found in India. – Cyc.

A-CES'TIS, n. [Gr.]

A factitious sort of chrysocolla, made of Cyprian verdigris, urine, and niter. – Cyc.

A-CE-TAB'U-LUM, n. [L. from acetum, vinegar. See Acid.]

  1. Among the Romans a vinegar cruse or like vessel, and a measure of about one eighth of a pint.
  2. In anatomy, the cavity of a bone for receiving the protuberant end of another bone, and therefore forming the articulation called enarthrosis. It is used especially for the cavity of the os innominatum, which receives the head of the thigh bone.
  3. In botany, the trivial name of a species of Peziza, the cup peziza; so called from its resemblance to a cup.
  4. A glandular substance found in the placenta of some animals.
  5. It is sometimes used in the sense of cotyledon.
  6. A species of lichen. – Cyc.

AC'E-TA-RY, n. [See Acid.]

An acid pulpy substance in certain fruits, as the pear, inclosed in a congeries of small calculous bodies, towards the base of the fruit. – Grew.

AC'E-TATE, n.

A salt formed by the union of acetic acid with any salifiable base.

AC'E-TA-TED, a.

Combined with acetic acid.

A-CE'TIC-AC'ID, n. [A-CE'TIC AC'ID.]

An acid composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, always in the same uniform and definite proportions. It exists in vinegar in a dilute and impure state.

A-CE-TI-FI-CA'TION, n.

The act of making acetous or sour; or the operation of making vinegar. – Cyc.