Dictionary: AN-NOUNCE'MENT – AN-NUL'MENT

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AN-NOUNCE'MENT, n. [announs'ment.]

The act of giving notice; proclamation; publication. – Month. Mag.

AN-NOUN'CER, n.

One that announces, or first gives notice; a proclaimer.

AN-NOUN'CING, ppr.

Introducing notice; first publishing; proclaiming.

AN-NOY', n.

Injury or molestation from continued acts or inconvenience. – Shak. Beattie.

AN-NOY', v.t. [Norm. annoyer, from neure, nuire, to hurt; Fr. nuire; It. nuocere; from L. noceo, to hurt, that is, to strike; Syr. ܢܒܐ, Ar. نَكَأَ naka, to strike, to hurt; Heb. and Ch. נבה, to strike. Hence probably L. neco, to kill. See Nuisance and Noxious.]

To incommode; to injure or disturb by continued or repeated acts; to tease, vex or molest; as to annoy an army, by impeding their march, or by a continued cannonade.

AN-NOY'ANCE, n.

That which annoys, or injures; the act of annoying; the state of being annoyed. It includes something more than inconvenience.

AN-NOY'ED, pp.

Incommoded, injured or molested by something that is continued or repeated.

AN-NOY'ER, n.

One that annoys.

AN-NOY'FUL, a.

Giving trouble; incommoding; molesting. [Not used.] – Chaucer.

AN-NOY'ING, ppr.

Incommoding; hurting; molesting.

AN-NOY'OUS, a.

Troublesome. [Not used.] – Chaucer.

AN'NU-AL, a. [Fr. annual; Sp. anual; It. annuale; L. annalis, from annus, a year; Gr. ενος, εννος; Sans. anda.]

  1. Yearly; that returns every year; coming yearly; as, an annual feast.
  2. Lasting or continuing only one year or season; that requires to be renewed every year; as, an annual plant. Leaves that grow in the spring, and perish in the autumn, are called annual, in opposition to evergreen.
  3. Performed in a year; as, the annual motion of the earth.

AN'NU-AL, n.

A plant that lives but one year, or rather but one summer. – Martyn.

AN'NU-AL, n.

A small book published yearly, containing select compositions and elegant engravings.

AN'NU-AL-LY, adv.

Yearly; returning every year; year by year.

AN-NU'I-TANT, n. [See Annuity.]

One who receives or is entitled to receive an annuity.

AN-NUITY, n. [Fr. annuité, from annus, a year. See Annual.]

A sum of money, payable yearly, to continue for a given number of years, for life or forever; an annual income, charged on the person of the grantor; or an annual allowance. Governments often borrow money upon annuities, that is, for a certain sum advanced on loan, the government contracts to pay the lender a specific sum, for life, or for a term of years. The stock created by such loans is transferable.

AN-NUL', v.t. [Fr. annuller, of L. ad nullum, to nothing.]

  1. To make void; to nullify; to abrogate; to abolish; used appropriately of laws, decrees, edicts, decisions of courts, or other established rules, permanent usages, and the like, which are made void by competent authority.
  2. To reduce to nothing; to obliterate. [Not in much use.] – Milton.

AN'NU-LAR, a. [L. annulus, a ring, from Celtic ain, a circle, and ul, young, small; annulus, a little circle.]

Having the form of a ring; pertaining to a ring. Annular crystal is when a hexahedral prism has six, or an octahedral prism eight marginal faces, disposed in a ring about each base; or when these prisms are truncated on all their terminal edges. – Cleaveland.

AN'NU-LA-RY, a.

Having the form of a ring. – Ray.

AN'NU-LA-TED, a.

Furnished with rings, or circles, like rings; having belts.

AN'NU-LET, n. [L. annulus, a ring.]

In architecture, a small square member in the Doric capital, under the quarter round; also a narrow flat molding, which is common to many places, as in the bases or capitals; called also a fillet, or listil, or cincture, or a list, timea, eyebrow or square rabbet. – Encyc. In heraldry, a little circle, borne as a charge in coats of arms; formerly reputed a mark of nobility and jurisdiction; it being the custom of prelates to receive their investiture per baculum et annulum, by staff and ring. It denotes also strength and eternity, by its circular form. Among the Romans, it represented liberty and distinction of rank. It denotes also difference, or mark of distinction, which the fifth brother of a family ought to bear on his coat of arms. – Encyc. Johnson.

AN-NUL'LED, pp.

Made void; abrogated.

AN-NUL'LING, ppr.

Abrogating; abolishing.

AN-NUL'MENT, n.

The act of annulling.