Dictionary: APH-O-RIS-TIC'AL-LY – A-PLOME'

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APH-O-RIS-TIC'AL-LY, adv.

In the form or manner of aphorisms.

APH'RITE, n. [Gr. αφρος, froth; the schaum erde, or earth scum, of Werner; the silvery chalk of Kirwan.]

A subvariety of carbonate of lime, occurring in small masses, solid, or tender and friable. It is composed of lamels or scales, of a pearly luster. It is connected by insensible shades with argentine. Jameson. Cleaveland.

APH'RI-ZITE, n.

A variety of black tourmalin. – Phillips.

APH-RO-DIS'I-AC, or APH-RO-DI-SI'AC-AL, a. [Gr. αφροδισιος, venereal, Αφροδιτη, Venus, from αφρος, froth.]

Exciting venereal desire; increasing the appetite for sexual connection.

APH-RO-DIS'I-AC, n.

A provocative to venery. – Encyc. Quincy.

APH'RO-DITE, or APH-RO-DI'TA, n.

  1. In zoology, a genus of the order of Mollusca, called also sea-mouse. The body is oval, with many small protuberances or tentacles on each side, which serve as feet. The mouth is cylindrical, at one end of the body, with two bristly tentacles, and capable of being retracted. – Encyc.
  2. A name of Venus, so called from Gr. αφρος, froth, from which the goddess was supposed to have been produced. [See Venus.]

APH'RO-DITE, n. [Gr. Αφροδιτη.]

A follower of Venus. – Cleaveland.

APH-THIT'A-LITE, n.

Prismatoidal glauber salt. – Shepard.

APH'THONG, n. [Gr. απο, without, and φθογγος, sound.]

A letter or combination of letters, which, in the customary pronunciation of a word, have no sound. – Focaloir, or Dict. of the Hiberno-Celtic Language.

APH'THOUS, a. [Gr. αφθαι, ulcers in the month.]

Pertaining to thrush; of the nature of thrush or ulcerous affections of the mouth. – Bigelow.

APH'YL-LOUS, a. [Gr. α neg. and φυλλον, folium, a leaf.]

In botany, destitute of leaves, as the rush, mushrooms, garlic, some sea-weeds, &c. – Milne.

A'PI-A-RIST, n.

One who keeps an apiary. – Kirby.

A'PI-A-RY, n. [L. apiarium, of apis, a bee.]

The place where bees are kept; a stand or shed for bees.

A'PI-AST-ER, n. [From apis, a bee.]

The bird called a bee-eater, a species of Merops. The apiaster has an iron-colored back, and a belly of bluish green. – Encyc.

A'PI-CES, or A'PEX-ES, n.

See APEX, and ANTHER.

A-PIC'U-LA-TED, a.

Terminated by a point, as a leaf.

A-PIECE', adv. [a and piece.]

To each; noting the share of each; as, here is an orange apiece.

A'PIS, n. [L.]

In zoology, the bee, a genus of insects of the order of Hymenopters. The mouth has two jaws, and a proboscis infolded in a double sheath; the wings are four, the two foremost covering the hinder ones when at rest. The females and working bees have a sting. – Encyc.

A'PIS, n.

In mythology, an ox, worshiped in ancient Egypt, or a divinity or idol in the figure of an ox.

A'PISH, a. [See Ape.]

Having the qualities of an ape; inclined to imitate in a servile manner; hence, foolish, foppish, affected, trifling, insignificant; as, an apish fellow; apish manners.

A'PISH-LY, adv.

In an apish manner; with servile intimation; foppishly.

A'PISH-NESS, n.

The quality of being apish; mimickry; foppery.

A-PIT'PAT, adv.

With quick beating or palpitation; a word formed from the sound, pit and pat, or from beat.

A-PLA-NAT'IC, a. [Gr. α neg. and πλαναω, to wander.]

An aplanatic telescope is one which entirely corrects the aberration of the rays of light. It is thus distinguished from the achromatic, which only partially corrects the aberration. – Ed. Encyc.

A-PLOME', n. [Gr. ἁπλοος, simple.]

A mineral closely allied to garnet. It is considered by Jameson, as crystalized common garnet. It is a rare mineral, found in dodecahedrons, with rhombic faces, supposed to be derived from the cube, by one of the most simple laws of decrement, that of a single range of particles, parallel to all the edges of a cube. Haüy. Cleaveland.